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Saffron Walden 

LIST OF SAFFRON WALDEN CHARITIES AS THEY EXISTED IN 1830s

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NOTE: while researching The Well-ordered Town: a story of Saffron Walden 1792-1862, I compiled a large collection of research notes which I now propose to share via the ULHR website. Please seek permission, which would normally be granted for non-commercial use, for copying of this material and acknowledge its source as the ULHR website with the web address [please bear in mInd these notes were made for my own research purposes, and need comparison with the original in order to check accuracy and understand the context].            

©Jacqueline Cooper 2008


NAME

DATE

BENEFACTIONS/CONDITIONS

Nos. (1830s)

Adams (or Tollesbury Charity)

1623

One quarter of income for clothing poor people of Walden; one quarter to the  master of the free grammar-school of Walden; one half for putting out poor children apprentices or on clothing”.

Almshouses

1400,new buildings 17? and 1832-4

Expulsion for swearers and ‘common haunters of alehouses’ ; but generally held for life, included various perks like fuel.

30 residents

Baptist Chapel

Money to poor of congregation Baptist Chapel Charity: £119s10d appropriate to poor of congregation, distributed annually by deacons: trustees Edmund Farmer Reeve of Saffron Walden and Samuel White of Depden

£119 p.a.

Barlee

Apprenticeship once every 6 years (or 7?)

Broomfield

1682

Apprenticing poor boys.

2-3 boys each year

Charity School

1715

Schooling for poor children + clothing

30 children

Elizabeth Erswells

1653

The “Twenty Shilling Money” was given in two halves - exclusions were?

Varying between 60 - 100 people

Falklands, Lady

1776

The ‘Eleven money’ was a clothing ticket for poor, preference to  “the sick and antient”.

39 people

Grammar School

(Closed until 1844)

Hubbard’s Charity

Unknown

Distributed bread to the poor on Good Friday

Leaders

1676 (or 1626?)

Bread for poor on the first Sunday in clean Lent and the Friday after Trinity Sunday”

12 people

Lord Howard de Walden’s Charity (Howard’s Livery)

1796

A large sum (£2000 in 3% Consols), the dividend to provide clothing for 12 poor men and 12 poor women of Saffron Walden, and 5 poor men and 5 poor women of Littlebury. Six Wenden poor were added in 1826 but this was possibly short-lived?

34 old people

Martin’s, Lettice Charity

1562 (or 1563?)

Money to the most aged and deserving poor women residing at Audley End” and to “all the most necessitous poor belonging to Walden, a preference being given to the aged and sick”. The share given to the latter varied from 1s to 5s, and to the poor women of Audley End, from 2s to 3s6d.

10-18 old people

Lying-in Charity Sheets were lent, and baby clothes

1807

for the relief of Poor Lying-in Women in their own Homes - loan of sheets and baby clothes. Also various other subscription charities.

Penniston’s (or Pennystone’s?)

1654

Bread weekly to the poor on Sundays in the church, after Divine Service

About 25 people?

Rand

Unknown

Small sums of money or bread to Castle St poor (only every few years?).

Negligible

Sparrow’s

1705

Rent of premises in Church Street distributed “amongst such honest and industrious poor inhabitants of  Saffron Walden as had been of honest life and conversation, or were aged, or overburthened with young children …”. The money was occasionally used to apprentice a poor boy but was more generally distributed annually, in small sums,  to six poor persons .

7 people

Suffolk & Turner’s

1688 - or 1690?

Apprenticing poor boys

3 boys in 1834

Symond’s

1481

Rent to mend foul highways

Turner’s, Edmund (of Audley End) Charity

1700

25s each to 20 Audleyend poor

5s each to 48 Walden poor.

68 people

Turner’s, Thomas

1623

Various bequets: some “for the increase of diet for the poor people of the almshouse in Walden upon every Christmas Day”; some for a preacher “who should make a memorial sermon upon the day whereon he should be buried” and for the sexton for preparing the bells and for persons to “ring the bells of the church of Walden on the same day”; also “five-dozen of penny - bread” weekly after Divine Service “upon poor people of Walden” in such a way that different people received each Sunday. The residue was “to be yearly bestowed in cloth, fitting for the wearing of poor people”.

?

Turner’s, William

1612

Weekly bread to poor people bread was distributed, in the church, after Divine Service

6 people

CHARITIES: including Erswells, Turners, Sparrows

3 new bodies of trustees 1836

Co-ordinating charity handouts, organising re-opening of old Grammar School

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